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Local residents and visitors from around the world come here looking for natural areas, trails, heritage features, beaches and other outdoor experiences. Luckily, we've got all that and more in the Regional Parks of the Central Okanagan.

Regional Parks can be found from Peachland in the south to Lake Country in the north. These parks provide experiences through an environmental education centre, heritage museums, beaches, pristine hiking trails, 2 campgrounds and park programs like nature photography.  There really is something for everyone.

Quick facts about the Regional Parks system:

  • There are 29 Regional Parks with more than 1,100 hectares in the Central Okanagan. ( Pick A Park Map)

  • Regional Parks are generally larger parks with natural areas that demonstrate important landscapes from our region. Link to Wheelchair Accessible Parks listing

  • They provide opportunities for outdoor activities that will attract people from throughout the Central Okanagan.

  • There are free interpretive programs for schools and community groups offered in most Regional Parks.  View the Parks Newsletter for information!

  • Several parks have heritage buildings or artifacts.

 

Popular Parks Information Links:

Living Greener in the Central Okanagan
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Regional Parks Services News:

Nut Tree Seedlings for Sale

A grant from the Tree Canada Edible Trees Program is helping to spread the work of Jack Gellatly beyond the boundary of the Gellatly Nut Farm Regional Park.

The program, supported by Loblaw Inc., Silk and TELUS, provided a $4,000 grant to the Regional District of Central Okanagan to expand the nursery compound in the park where nut tree seedlings are germinated, grown and now available for sale to the public and interested growers. 

Here’s your chance to start your own nut tree legacy by growing one of the unique Gellatly Family bred nut tree species.  Two gallon potted seedlings are now available for $20.  Funds raised from the sale of seedlings will assist the Gellatly Nut Farm Society for park enhancements and continuation of the seedling program.  Seedlings will be on sale during the annual Nut Farm Harvest Fair, Saturday, September 27th from 10:00 am – 3:00 pm in the park, 2375 Whitworth Road in West Kelowna.  They’re also available for purchase from Society volunteers at Gellatly House in the park from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm daily until early November.

The nut orchard at Gellatly Nut Farm Regional Park produces walnuts, tree hazels, butternuts, buartnuts, heartnuts, chestnut and hazelnuts from hardy tree stock.  These mature trees are a valuable seed and scion source for producing local nut trees and to promote the unique nut trees developed in the 1920’s and 1930’s by Jack Gellatly.

The Tree Canada Edible Trees Program supports municipalities, schools and community gardens to purchase, plant and maintain nut and fruit trees enhancing community access to fruit and nut trees.

Largest Ever Regional Park Announced

It’s an ecological gem; a unique, geological landmark that towers over Kelowna’s eastern boundary.  Now it is protected. 

Black Mountain/Sntsk‘il’ntən Regional Park has officially been announced at a ceremony with Regional District Chair Robert Hobson, Westbank First Nation Chief Robert Louie and the Honourable Steve Thomson, BC Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.

The creation of the 510-hectare (1,260-acres) Regional Park comes with $7-million in funding from the Regional Parks Legacy and Park Land Reserve funds, a $2.3-million donation through the Federal Government Ecological Gift Program and a co-tenure/management agreement between the Regional District and Westbank First Nation for a License of Occupation on 121.5-hectares (300-acres) of Crown Land, with a sponsorship value of $1,024,350.

This 31st Regional Park includes the purchase of 259-hectares (640-acres) of private land; the donation of 129.5-hectares (320-acres) of land through the Ecological Gifts Program and the joint Crown Land tenure with Westbank First Nation.  The new park will be co-managed by the Regional District and Westbank First Nation.

Regional Board Chair Robert Hobson says, “The unique geological formation of Black Mountain is often the first thing many people see when they arrive by road or by air.  It offers spectacular views but more importantly, preserves and protects a critically valuable dry grassland ecosystem, that’s under-represented and increasingly threatened and disappearing from the Okanagan valley landscape.  This area supports a rich and diverse wildlife population, of which many species are endangered or threatened.”

He adds, “I’m extremely pleased that the Westbank First Nation is partnering with the Regional District in the tenure and management of important Crown Land parcels that are a key part of the new regional park.  As well, on behalf of the Regional Board I thank the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations for approving our tenure agreement and seeing the value in the creation of Black Mountain/ Sntsk‘il’ntən Regional Park.”

The inclusion of the syilx/Okanagan word Sntsk‘il’ntən (sinch-KEEL-en-tin) in the Black Mountain park name is fitting as it translates to “the place where arrowheads/flint rock is found”.  The property has additional First Nations cultural significance as there is quite an array of plants and medicines found in the area. 

“Anytime an area within our traditional territory is protected, we are pleased,” says WFN Chief Robert Louie.  “Lythics found in the area demonstrate it was a significant gathering place for our ancestors to make the necessary survival tools and, we can assume, it was a vantage point from which the valley below could be scoped out for wildlife and intruders."

“The provision of the Crown land grant to this new regional park is just one example of how Crown land can be used for the greater good of the community. It is also wonderful that the regional district and Westbank First Nation are able to partner on managing this park for the benefit of residents and tourists,” says Steve Thomson, Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.

The new park will remain closed to the public while a management plan is created and trails and signage are developed that will ensure education and awareness and the protection of the sensitive grassland environment. 

In 2008, the Regional Board unanimously agreed to establish a special tax requisition over five years to build the Parks Legacy Fund in order to leverage the purchase and protection of important properties for the Regional Park system.  Since that time, along with funding from the Park Land Reserve Fund, $22.1-million in property purchases have been made.   Along with land donations and Crown tenure agreements valued at $11.3-million, almost 900 additional hectares (2,200-acres) of land has been added to the Regional Park system worth over $33.4-million.  Parkland Acquisitions

2014 is the 40th anniversary of the Central Okanagan Regional Park system.  Since it began in the fall of 1974 and with the purchase of the almost four-hectare Kaloya Regional Park in Lake Country in early 1975, it’s grown to protect more than 1,900-hectares of land in 31 Regional Parks. 

New Goat's Peak Regional Park

The protection of a sizable portion of environmentally important Okanagan Lake waterfront is ensured with creation of Goat’s Peak Regional Park.  

The Regional District of Central Okanagan purchased a 52-hectare (128-acre) property along the West Kelowna shoreline to establish the new regional Park.  The property includes almost 900-meters (2,955-feet) of waterfront, which has extremely high spawning habitat value for Okanagan Lake kokanee salmon.

The $5-million purchase comes from contributions of local governments to the Regional Parks Legacy and Park Land Reserve Funds.

Regional Board Chair Robert Hobson says, “For many years, residents and various community groups have called on local governments to protect the important waterfront and upland ecosystem of the Goat’s Peak area.  Today through the two Regional Park funds, on behalf of all Central Okanagan residents, I’m pleased to announce that we’re delivering with the creation of Goat’s Peak Regional Park saving this land for the enjoyment of future generations.”  View RDCO Youtube Channel Video

Hobson adds, “The purchase of this property for the new regional park fills a significant gap in the Okanagan Trail 2000 vision for a continuous recreational trail between the Bennett Bridge and Peachland.  It, along with the existing Kalamoir and Gellatly Nut Farm Regional Parks remain in their natural state which helps to preserve accessible areas along the Okanagan Lake shoreline for the enjoyment of all Central Okanagan residents.” 

He says, “The new Goat’s Peak Regional Park is close to existing and potential residential areas and is critical to preserving the long term sustainability and character of the Okanagan Valley.  It has high ecological conservation value and supports a low-impact recreational/interpretive potential in order to protect the natural landscape.”

The new park will remain closed until at least next summer as the Regional District prepares a management plan and develops trails and signage.

In 2008, the Regional Board unanimously agreed to establish a special tax requisition over five years to build the Parks Legacy Fund in order to leverage the purchase and protection of important properties for the Regional Park system.  Hobson adds, “With today’s announcement, $14.2-million in property purchases have been funded, adding more than 91-hectares (225-acres) to the Regional Park system.

2014 is the 40th anniversary of the Central Okanagan Regional Park system.  Since it began in the fall of 1974 and with the purchase of the almost four-hectare Kaloya Regional Park in Lake Country in early 1975, it’s grown to protect more than 1,400-hectares of land in 30 Regional Parks.

Kokanee Exhibit at the EECO

The land locked Kokanee salmon are making their annual spawning run along the many tributaries of Okanagan Lake or along the lake shore itself. During the late summer and fall, local streams will be full of the red, fresh water cousins of the Sockeye.

Now through early-October, you’re invited to learn more about this interesting and important fish to the Okanagan at the ‘Kokanee’ exhibit in the Environmental Education Centre for the Okanagan or EECO.  It’s open Tuesday through Sunday in Mission Creek Regional Park, Springfield and Durnin Roads.

For more information on this and other EECO programs, check out ‘Your Guide to Regional Parks’, visit the Regional District website (regionaldistrict.com/parksevents) or contact the EECO at 250-469-6140.

Kokanee Interpretation Programs

You’re invited to witness an annual rite of nature while learning more about the life of the Kokanee salmon. 

Check out the Regional Parks ‘Kokanee Spawning Interpretive Program’ weekends in Mission Creek Regional Park off Springfield Road and Hardy Falls Regional Parkin Peachland. 

A Parks Interpreter will be on site each weekend until Sunday, September 28th at Hardy Falls Regional Park (off Highway 97 south at Hardy Street in Peachland).  The interpretation program runs each Saturday and Sunday until October 5th at Mission Creek Regional Park.  Interpreters will be on site from 12 noon to 4:00 pm at each location.   Weekday school tours and special presentations for community groups start September 2nd and may be booked by donation through the EECO (Environmental Education Centre for the Okanagan).

For more information on this and other EECO and Regional Parks programs visit the Regional District website regionaldistrict.com/parksevents or contact the EECO at 250-469-6140.

Lower Glen Canyon Regional Park Closure

The lower portion of Glen Canyon Regional Park off Gellatly Road in West Kelowna will be closed starting September 2nd for up to eight weeks for trail upgrades. (See map)

The trails between Gellatly Road and the new bridge span upstream will remain closed until approximately the end of October. Please obey any signage and barricades directing visitors around the closed area.  Other areas of the park will still be open and accessible, including the loop trail that links with the District of West Kelowna’s Westbank Centre Park, just off May Street.

Much of this work is being funded as part of a grant through the Provincial Government’s Community Recreation Program Trails to Health project.  In addition to trail improvements, information and signage, the work will see existing staircases and crib steps replaced and a new parking area established off Gellatly Road.  As a part of this project and a recent parkland management agreement with the District of West Kelowna, the Regional District will upgrade trails through a portion of West Kelowna municipal parkland that will be maintained as a part of Glen Canyon Regional Park trail system.

The Regional District thanks park users for their patience and understanding while this park access enhancement work is done. 

Raise Your Bear-Awareness

Part of the attractiveness of our Central Okanagan Regional Parks is that visitors experience wild, untouched, natural settings.  That also means they may encounter wildlife at any time.   And as summer draws to a close, visiting our more natural Regional Parks requires more bear awareness.

Across the Okanagan Kokanee salmon are starting to spawn and orchard crops are ripening.   With that there’s increasing evidence of bear activity as they leave the higher elevations in search of food in the valley.

Evidence that bears are around is already occurring along the Mission Creek Greenway, in Mission Creek, Scenic Canyon and Hardy Falls Regional Parks.  Each year, evidence of their presence is also often found in other more natural regional parks like Bertram Creek, Glen Canyon, Johns Family Nature Conservancy, Kalamoir, Mill Creek, Rose Valley and Woodhaven Nature Conservancy.

“Usually around this time of year, our parks staff and visitors start seeing more signs of bears in some of our Regional Parks.  As sightings increase, we post signs advising that the animals may be active in the area” says Communications Officer Bruce Smith.

He says “to reduce your chance of an encounter, if possible travel in a group, make noise or carry something that makes noise.  During the fall fish spawning season local creeks and rivers can be teaming with spawning salmon.  As a result, visitors may encounter bears taking advantage of this plentiful food source.  Bears fishing for food may not hear you over the noise of the creek water.   If you see a bear, give it plenty of space and stay well away from it.” 

People should respect all bears and anticipate and avoid encounters with them whenever possible.  Bears can be aggressive, especially when defending their food or their cubs.  They also have excellent senses of smell and hearing, and better sight than you might believe.  Dog owners are reminded when in Regional Parks that their pets must be leashed and kept on trails at all times.  It’s not only the law, but will help avoid any potentially serious wildlife encounter.

Residents also have a role to play in preventing animal confrontations on their property by keeping any garbage securely stored and wheeling their garbage cart out only on the morning of their regular curbside collection.  That helps to reduce the potential temptation for bears or other wildlife.

Useful Bear Links

British Columbia Conservation Foundation (WildSafe BC) Bear Aware program  - www.bearaware.bc.ca

Ministry of Environment Bear Smart program  - www.env.gov.bc.ca/wld/bearsmart/bearsmintro.html

Fall Tracks Registration Underway

Register now for the free fall session of the popular ‘Tracks Walking Club’ at the Environmental Education Centre for the Okanagan in Mission Creek Regional Park.  There’s no cost to sign up and members receive a walking journal, walking tips, seminars and motivational tips that keep you moving. View Poster

The popular graduated walking program runs for six weeks starting September 8th and wraps up October 15th.  Each Monday and Wednesday morning at 9:00 (no walk Thanksgiving Monday) club members will join our walking leader along the Mission Creek Greenway and in Mission Creek Regional Park.  People at a beginner fitness level are encouraged to take part gradually increasing their health, stamina and walking duration to 60 minutes.  The goal is for participants to join in on the Kokanee Run/Walk on Saturday, October 18th.

This program is recognized as a BC Heart and Stroke Foundation‘Hearts in Motion’ walking club.

For more information about this or other Regional Park programs please visit the Regional District website regionaldistrict.com/parksevents or contact the EECO at 250-469-6149.

'Share the Trail'

It’s a 16.5-kilometer multi-use recreational corridor that certainly sees its share of people each day. 

It’s estimated that more than a thousand people take to the Mission Creek Greenway Regional Park each day.   A few may be on horseback, many more are on foot either running or walking and an increasing number of cyclists use the trail for both recreation and as an off-road commuting corridor.

“We see people using the Greenway in a variety of ways,” says Communications Officer Bruce Smith.   “They may be getting their daily exercise, out for a relaxing stroll along the creek or simply getting from point A to B.  Dog owners will have their pets on leash, while others are pushing strollers with infants.  During the spring, summer and fall months there’s a huge increase in the number of people using the Greenway each day.  As a result of all these various visitors and uses, sometimes there can be near-misses and periodic conflicts.”

Smith adds, “Our goal is to ensure everyone using the Greenway is aware that they have to ‘Share the Trail’ and should be aware of other users around them when they are on the recreational corridor.”

Parks Services Bylaw Enforcement Officer Blaise Laveay adds, “We’re out each day of the year patrolling sections of the Greenway and from May to September we have added staff making more frequent daily spot checks, watching for people who may not be aware of they are responsible for proper trail etiquette, in order to keep everyone safe.”

He says, “Along the Greenway, cyclists shouldn’t go faster than ten kilometers an hour and should keep to the right side of the trail, unless they are passing someone on foot.  They should also give an indication that they are approaching from behind by ringing a bell, honking a horn or simply vocally acknowledging their passing to the left.  So that everyone can share the Greenway, cyclists and pedestrians should yield to horse riders while cyclists should yield to pedestrians.  Generally speaking, for their safety, everyone on the trail should be aware of those around them. 

Under the Regional Parks Bylaw all dogs must be kept on leash and must stay on designated trails.   Animal owners are reminded to pick up waste deposited along the trail.  All residents should remember that unauthorized motorized vehicles are not allowed along the Greenway.

Parks for All Seasons

Here's a new short video that shows some of our regional parks at every time of year!

Greenway Closed at Lakeshore

From Tuesday, May 20th to approximately November, you won’t be able to use the Mission Creek Greenway Regional Park access at Lakeshore Road.

That area will be completely closed while the City of Kelowna replaces the bridge over Mission Creek as part of the Lakeshore Road upgrade project. 

Signs will be posted at key access points along the Mission Creek Greenway multi-use trail, advising that trail users cannot access the Lakeshore Road trailhead area while the bridge construction is underway.  A turn-around will be in place on the north side of Mission Creek at the Lakeshore Road construction site.

A number of alternate trailhead and parking locations are available during the construction closure.  People can still access the Mission Creek Greenway and parking areas at the Mission Sportsfields, KLO Road, Casorso Road, Mission Creek Regional Park (Springfield and Durnin Roads and at the end of Ziprick Road) and the Hollywood Road south entrance to Scenic Canyon Regional Park.

When the bridge replacement and road project is complete, an underpass will provide safe access to the popular regional Greenway recreational trail. 

For information regarding Mission Creek Greenway Regional Park visit regionaldistrict.com.  For information regarding road closures, project information and potential delays visit kelowna.ca/roadreport

 

 

























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